The Northern Way

The Swastika: The Earliest Known Symbol & its Migrations

Transcribed by Alfta Svani Lothursdottir


       This report presented by Thomas Wilson Curator, Department of Prehistoric Anthropology, U.S. National Museum, in 1894, is here reproduced in the hopes of educating our fellow Heathens as well as the general public about the Swastika, one of Heathenism's oldest and most holy of symbols. Since this report was made long before the misuse of this holy symbol by the Nazi's you will find an unprejudiced presentation of the Swastika and it's history. Read on and learn the true history of this holy symbol.


A note on illustrations


      There are over 400 graphics in this work and it my goal to present them in the most convenient way I can. To that end I have included all graphics that are small enough as to not impede on the text on the pages themselves. But there are many graphics that are too large to do this, so with those graphics I have provided a link that will open a new window for you to view the graphic. At the bottom of each new window is a link that can be clicked on to close the new window and thereby easily return to the text.

> Page 1: Preface

I. Definitions, Description, and Origin.

> Page 2:Different Forms of the Cross.

> Page 3
> Page 4: Names and Definitions of the Swastika
> Page 5: Symbolism and Interpretation
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> Page 7
> Page 8
> Page 9
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> Page 11
> Page 12
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> Page 18: Origin and Habitat
> Page 19
> Page 20

II. – Dispersion of the Swastika.

> Page 21: Extreme Orient Japan, Korea, China
> Page 22
> Page 23
> Page 24: Plate 1
> Page 25: Plate 2
> Page 26: Plate 3
> Page 27: Plate 4
> Page 28: Plate 5
> Page 29: Plate 6
> Page 30: Plate 7
> Page 31: Plate 8
> Page 32: Tibet, India
> Page 33

Classical Orient. Babylonia, Assyria and Persia.


> Page 34:Phenicia, Lycaonia, Armenia

Asia Minor

> Page 35: Troy (Hissarlik)
> Page 36
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Africa

> Page 47: Egypt
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> Page 49

Algeria, Ashantee C
lassical Occident --- Mediterranean

> Page 50: Greece and the Islands of Cyprus, Rhodes, Melos, and Thera
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> Page 57

Europe

> Page 58: Bronze Age
> Page 59
> Page 60
> Page 61: Swiss Lake Dwellings
> Page 62: Germany and Austria; Belgium
> Page 63: Scandinavia
> Page 64: Scotland and Ireland
> Page 65: Gallo Roman Period - France
> Page 66: Anglo-Saxon Period - Britain; The Swastika on Ancient Coins
> Page 67: Triskelion, Sicily
> Page 68: Triskelion, Isle of Man
> Page 69
> Page 70: Plate 9
> Page 71: Swastika on Ancient Hindu Coins
> Page 72: Swastika on coins in Mesembria and Gaza; Swastika on Danish gold bracteates;
United States of America
Pre-Columbian Times - Fains Island and Toco Mounds, Tennessee

> Page 73
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> Page 78: Hopewell Mound, Chillicothe, Ross County, Ohio
> Page 79: Plate 12
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> Page 82: Plate 14
> Page 83: (Plate 13)
> Page 84: Mounds in Arkansas
> Page 85: North American Indians - The Kansas
> Page 86: The Sac Indians (Plate 15)
> Page 87: The Pueblos (Plate 16)
> Page 88: The Navajoes
> Page 89
> Page 90: Plate 17
> Page 91
> Page 92: The Pimas; Colonial Patchwork
> Page 93: Central America: Nicaragua; Yucatan; Costa Rica; South America: Brazil
> Page 94: (Plate 18)
> Page 95: Map
III. Forms Allied to the Swastika.

> Page 96: Paraguay; Meanders, Ogees, and Spirals, Bent To the Left As Well As To the Right
> Page 97: Aboriginal American Engravings and Paintings - Designs on Shell; Ivory-billed  Woodpecker
> Page 98: The triskele, tirskleios,  or triquetrum
> Page 99
> Page 100: The Spider
> Page 101: The Rattlesnake; The  Human Face and Form
> Page 102
> Page 103: Designs on Pottery
> Page 104
> Page 105
> Page 106: Designs on Basketry

IV. The Cross Among The American Indians.

> Page 107: Different Forms; The Cross On Objects Of Shell and Copper
> Page 108
> Page 109: Plate 19
> Page 110
> Page 111: The Cross on Pottery
> Page 112: Plate 20
> Page 113: Symbolic Meanings of The Cross
> Page 114: The Four Winds
> Page 115: Sun and Star Symbols; Dwellings; Dragonfly; Midé or Shamans; Flocks of Birds
> Page 116: Human Forms; Maidenhood; Shaman's Spirit; Divers Significations
> Page 117
> Page 118
> Page 119: Introduction of the Cross Into America
> Page 120: Decorative Forms Not Of the Cross, But Allied To the Swastika: Color Stamps From Mexico and Venezuela

V. Significance Of the Swastika.

> Page 121
> Page 122

VI. The Migration Of Symbols.

> Page 123: Migration Of the Swastika
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> Page 126
> Page 127: Migration of Classic Symbols: The Sacred Tree of the Assyrians; The Sacred Cone of Mesopotamia; The Crux Ansata, the Key of Life; The Winged Globe
> Page 128: Greek Art and Architecture; The Greek Fret
> Page 129: The Caduceus; The Trisula; The double-headed eagle on the escutcheon of Austria and Russia; The lion rampant of Belgium

VII. --- Prehistoric Objects Associated With the Swastika, Found In both Hemispheres, and Believed to Have Passed by Migration.

> Page 130: Spindle-Whorls, Europe: Switzerland - Lake Dwellings
> Page 131: Italy; Wurtemburg; France
> Page 132: North America --- Pre- Columbian Times (Plate 21)
> Page 133: Mexico (Plate 22)
> Page 134: Central America: Nicaragua
> Page 135: South America: Chiriqui; Columbia; Peru (Plate 23)
> Page 136
> Page 137: (Page 24)
> Page 138: (Plate 25)
> Page 139: Bobbins: Europe; United States

VIII. --- Similar Prehistoric Art, Industries, and Implements In Europe and America as Evidence of the Migration of Culture.

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Bibliography

> Page 144
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