The Northern Way

The Juniper-Tree

The Juniper-Tree.

It is now long ago, quite two thousand years, since there was a rich man who had a beautiful and pious wife, and they loved each other dearly. They had, however, no children, though they wished for them very much, and the woman prayed for them day and night, but still they had none. Now there was a court-yard in front of their house in which was a juniper tree, and one day in winter the woman was standing beneath it, paring herself an apple, and while she was paring herself the apple she cut her finger, and the blood fell on the snow. Ah, said the woman, and sighed right heavily, and looked at the blood before her, and was most unhappy, ah, if I had but a child as red as blood and as white as snow. And while she thus spoke, she became quite happy in her mind, and felt just as if that were going to happen. Then she went into the house and a month went by and the snow was gone, and two months, and then everything was green, and three months, and then all the flowers came out of the earth, and four months, and then all the trees in the wood grew thicker, and the green branches were all closely entwined, and the birds sang until the wood resounded and the blossoms fell from the trees, then the fifth month passed away and she stood under the juniper tree, which smelt so sweetly that her heart leapt, and she fell on her knees and was beside herself with joy, and when the sixth month was over the fruit was large and fine, and then she was quite still, and the seventh month she snatched at the juniper-berries and ate them greedily, then she grew sick and sorrowful, then the eighth month passed, and she called her husband to her, and wept and said, if I die then bury me beneath the juniper tree. Then she was quite comforted and happy until the next month was over, and then she had a child as white as snow and as red as blood, and when she beheld it she was so delighted that she died.

Von dem Machandelboom

Dat is nu all lang heer, wol ewe dusend Johr, do wöör dar en ryk Mann, de hadd ene schöne frame Fru, un se hadden sik beyde sehr leef, hadden awerst kene Kinner, se wünschden sik awerst sehr welke, un de Fru bedd,d so veel dorüm Dag un Nacht, man se kregen keen un kregen keen. Vör erem Huse wöör en Hof, dorup stünn en Machandelboom, ünner dem stunn de Fru eens im Winter un schelld sik enen Appel, un as se sik den Appel so schelld, so sneet se sik in,n Finger, un dat Blood feel in den Snee. 'Ach,' säd de Fru, un süft,d so recht hoog up, un seg dat Blood vör sik an, un wöör so recht wehmödig, 'hadd ik doch en Kind, so rood as Blood un so witt as Snee.' Un as se dat säd, so wurr ehr so recht fröhlich to Mode: ehr wöör recht, as schull dat wat warden. Do güng se to dem Huse, un,t güng een Maand hen, de Snee vorgüng: un twe Maand, do wöör dat gröön: und dre Maand, do kömen de Blömer uut der Eerd: un veer Maand, do drungen sik alle Bömer in dat Holt, un de grönen Twyge wören all in eenanner wussen: door süngen de Vögelkens, dat dae ganße Holt schalld, un de Blöiten felen von den Bömern: do wörr de fofte Maand wech, un se stünn ünner dem Machandelboom, de röök so schön, do sprüng ehr dat Hart vör Freuden, un se füll up ere Knee un kunn sik nich laten: un as de soste Maand vorby wöör, do wurren de Früchte dick un staark, do wurr se ganß still: un de söwde Maand, do greep se na den Machandelbeeren un eet se so nydsch, do wurr se trurig un krank: do güng de achte Maand hen, un se reep eren Mann un weend un säd 'wenn ik staarw, so begraaf my ünner den Machandelboom.' Do wurr se ganß getrost, un freude sik, bet de neegte Maand vorby wöör, do kreeg se en Kind so witt as Snee un so rood as Blood, un as se dat seeg, so freude se sik so, dat se stürw.

Then her husband buried her beneath the juniper tree, and he began to weep sore, after some time he was more at ease, and though he still wept he could bear it, and after some time longer he took another wife. Do begroof ehr Mann se ünner den Machandelboom, un he füng an to wenen so sehr: ene Tyd lang, do wurr dat wat sachter, un do he noch wat weend hadd, do hüll he up, un noch en Tyd, do nöhm he sik wedder ene Fru.
By the second wife he had a daughter, but the first wife's child was a little son, and he was as red as blood and as white as snow. When the woman looked at her daughter she loved her very much, but then she looked at the little boy and it seemed to cut her to the heart, for the thought came into her mind that he would always stand in her way, and she was for ever thinking how she could get all the fortune for her daughter, and the evil one filled her mind with this till she was quite wroth with the little boy and she pushed him from one corner to the other and slapped him here and cuffed him there, until the poor child was in continual terror, for when he came out of school he had no peace in any place. Mit de tweden Fru kreeg he ene Dochter, dat Kind awerst von der eersten Fru wöör en lüttje Sähn, un wöör so rood as Blood un so witt as Snee. Wenn de Fru ere Dochter so anseeg, so hadd se se so leef, awerst denn seeg se den lüttjen Jung an, un dat güng ehr so dorch,t Hart, un ehr düchd, as stünn he ehr allerwegen im Weg, un dachd denn man jümmer, wo se ehr Dochter all dat Vörmägent towenden wull, un de Böse gaf ehr dat in, dat se dem lüttjen Jung ganß gramm wurr un stödd em herüm von een Eck in de anner, un buffd em hier un knuffd em door, so dat dat aarme Kind jümmer in Angst wöör. Wenn he denn uut de School köhm, so hadd he kene ruhige Städ.
One day the woman had gone upstairs to her room, and her little daughter went up too, and said, mother, give me an apple. Yes, my child, said the woman, and gave her a fine apple out of the chest, but the chest had a great heavy lid with a great sharp iron lock. Mother, said the little daughter, is brother not to have one too. This made the woman angry, but she said, yes, when he comes out of school. And when she saw from the window that he was coming, it was just as if the devil entered into her, and she snatched at the apple and took it away again from her daughter, and said, you shall not have one before your brother. Then she threw the apple into the chest, and shut it. Then the little boy came in at the door, and the devil made her say to him kindly, my son, will you have an apple. And she looked wickedly at him. Mother, said the little boy, how dreadful you look. Yes, give me an apple. Then it seemed to her as if she were forced to say to him, come with me, and she opened the lid of the chest and said, take out an apple for yourself, and while the little boy was stooping inside, the devil prompted her, and crash. She shut the lid down, and his head flew off and fell among the red apples. Then she was overwhelmed with terror, and thought, if I could but make them think that it was not done by me. So she went upstairs to her room to her chest of drawers, and took a white handkerchief out of the top drawer, and set the head on the neck again, and folded the handkerchief so that nothing could be seen, and she set him on a chair in front of the door, and put the apple in his hand. Eens wöör de Fru up de Kamer gaan, do köhm de lüttje Dochter ook herup un säd 'Moder, gif my enen Appel.''Ja, myn Kind,' säd de Fru un gaf ehr enen schönen Appel uut der Kist; de Kist awerst hadd einen grooten sworen Deckel mit en groot schaarp ysern Slott. 'Moder,' säd de lüttje Dochter, 'schall Broder nich ook enen hebben?' Dat vördrööt de Fru, doch säd se 'ja, wenn he uut de School kummt.' Un as se uut dat Fenster wohr wurr, dat he köhm, so wöör dat recht, as wenn de Böse äwer ehr köhm, un se grappst to un nöhm erer Dochter den Appel wedder wech und säd 'du schalst nich ehr enen hebben as Broder.' Do smeet se den Appel in de Kist un maakd de Kist to: do köhm de lüttje Jung in de Döhr, do gaf ehr de Böse in, dat se fründlich to em säd 'myn Sähn, wullt du enen Appel hebben?' un seeg em so hastig an. 'Moder,' säd de lüttje Jung, 'wat sühst du gräsig uut! ja, gif my enen Appel.' Do wöör ehr, as schull se em toreden. 'Kumm mit my,' säd se un maakd den Deckel up, 'hahl dy enen Appel heruut.' Un as sik de lüttje Jung henin bückd, so reet ehr de Böse, bratsch! slöögt se den Deckel to, dat de Kopp afflöög un ünner de roden Appel füll. Da äwerleep ehr dat in de Angst, un dachd 'kunn ich dat von my bringen!' Da güng se bawen na ere Stuw na erem Draagkasten un hahl uut de bäwelste Schuuflad enen witten Dook, un sett,t den Kopp wedder up den Hals un bünd den Halsdook so üm, dat,n niks sehn kunn, un sett,t em vör de Döhr up enen Stohl un gaf em den Appel in de Hand.
After this Marlinchen came into the kitchen to her mother, who was standing by the fire with a pan of hot water before her which she was constantly stirring round. "Mother," said Marlinchen, "brother is sitting at the door, and he looks quite white and has an apple in his hand. I asked him to give me the apple, but he did not answer me, and I was quite frightened." "Go back to him," said her mother, "and if he will not answer you, give him a box on the ear." So Marlinchen went to him and said, "Brother, give me the apple." But he was silent, and she gave him a box on the ear, whereupon his head fell off. Marlinchen was terrified, and began crying and screaming, and ran to her mother, and said, "Alas, mother, I have knocked my brother's head off," and she wept and wept and could not be comforted. "Marlinchen," said the mother, what have you done, but be quiet and let no one know it, it cannot be helped now, we will make him into black-puddings." Then the mother took the little boy and chopped him in pieces, put him into the pan and made him into black puddings, but Marlinchen stood by weeping and weeping, and all her tears fell into the pan and there was no need of any salt. Do köhm doorna Marleenken to erer Moder in de Kääk, de stünn by dem Führ un hadd enen Putt mit heet Water vör sik, den röhrd se jümmer üm. 'Moder,' säd Marleenken, 'Broder sitt vör de Döhr un süht ganz witt uut un hett enen Appel in de Hand, ik heb em beden, he schull my den Appel gewen, awerst he antwöörd my nich, do wurr my ganß grolich.' 'Gah nochmaal hen,' säd de Moder, 'un wenn he dy nich antworden will, so gif em eens an de Oren.' Da güng Marleenken hen und säd 'Broder, gif my den Appel. Awerst he sweeg still. do gaf se em eens up de Oren, do feel de Kopp herünn, doräwer vörschrock se sik un füng an to wenen un to roren, un löp to erer Moder un säd 'ach, Moder, ik hebb mynen Broder den Kopp afslagen,' un weend un weend un wull sik nich tofreden gewen. 'Marleenken,' säd de Moder, 'wat hest du dahn! awerst swyg man still, dat et keen Mensch markt, dat is nu doch nich to ännern; wy willen em in Suhr kaken.' Da nöhm de Moder den lüttjen Jung un hackd em in Stücken, ded de in den Putt un kaakd em in Suhr. Marleenken awerst stünn daarby un weend un weend, un de Tranen füllen all in den Put, un se bruukden gorr keen Solt.
Then the father came home, and sat down to dinner and said, "But where is my son?" And the mother served up a great dish of black-puddings, and Marlinchen wept and could not leave off. Then the father again said, "But where is my son?" "Ah," said the mother, "he has gone across the country to his mother's great uncle, he will stay there awhile." "And what is he going to do there? He did not even say good-bye to me." "Oh, he wanted to go, and asked me if he might stay six weeks, he is well taken care of there." "Ah," said the man, "I feel so unhappy lest all should not be right. He ought to have said good-bye to me." With that he began to eat and said, Da köhm de Vader to Huus und sett,t sik to Disch un säd 'wo is denn myn Sähn?' Da droog de Moder ene groote groote Schöttel up mit Swartsuhr, un Marleenken weend un kunn sich nich hollen. Do säd de Vader wedder 'wo is denn myn Sähn?' 'Ach,' säd de Moder, 'he is äwer Land gaan, na Mütten erer Grootöhm: he wull door wat blywen.' 'Wat dait he denn door? un heft my nich maal adjüüs sechd!' 'O he wull geern hen un bed my, of he door wol sos Wäken blywen kunn; he is jo woll door uphawen.' 'Ach,' säd de Mann, 'my is so recht trurig, dat is doch nich recht, he hadd my doch adjüüs sagen schullt.' Mit des füng he an to äten und säd
"Marlinchen, why are you crying? Your brother will certainly come back." Then he said, "Ah, wife, how delicious this food is, give me some more." And the more he ate the more he wanted to have, and he said, "Give me some more, you shall have none of it. It seems to me as if it were all mine." And he ate and ate and threw all the bones under the table, until he had finished the whole. But Marlinchen went away to her chest of drawers, and took her best silk handkerchief out of the bottom draw, and got all the bones from beneath the table, and tied them up in her silk handkerchief, and carried them outside the door, weeping tears of blood. Then she lay down under the juniper tree on the green grass, and after she had lain down there, she suddenly felt light-hearted and did not cry any more. Then the juniper tree began to stir itself, and the branches parted asunder, and moved together again, just as if someone were rejoicing and clapping his hands. At the same time a mist seemed to arise from the tree, and in the center of this mist it burned like a fire, and a beautiful bird flew out of the fire singing magnificently, and he flew high up in the air, and when he was gone, the juniper tree was just as it had been before, and the handkerchief with the bones was no longer there. Marlinchen, however, was as gay and happy as if her brother were still alive. And she went merrily into the house, and sat down to dinner and ate. 'Marleenken, wat weenst du? Broder wart wol wedder kamen.' 'Ach, Fru,' säd he do, 'wat smeckt my dat Äten schöön! Gif my mehr!' Un je mehr he eet, je mehr wull he hebben, un säd 'geeft my mehr, gy schöhlt niks door af hebben, dat is, as wenn dat all myn wör.' Un he eet un eet, un de Knakens smeet he all ünner den Disch, bet he allens up hadd. Marleenken awerst güng hen na ere Kommod und nöhm ut de ünnerste Schuuf eren besten syden Dook, un hahl all de Beenkens und Knakens ünner den Disch heruut un bünd se in den syden Dook und droog se vör de Döhr un weend ere blödigen Tranen. Door läd se se ünner den Machandelboom in dat gröne Gras, un as se se door henlechd hadd, so war ehr mit eenmal so recht licht, un weend nich mer. Do füng de Machandelboom an sik to bewegen, un de Twyge deden sik jümmer so recht von eenanner, un denn wedder tohoop, so recht as wenn sik eener so recht freut un mit de Händ so dait. Mit des so güng dar so,n Newel von dem Boom, un recht in dem Newel, dar brennd dat as Führ, un uut dem Führ, dar flöög so'n schönen Vagel heruut, de süng so herrlich und flöög hoog in de Luft, un as he wech wöör, do wöör de Machand elboom, as he vörhen west wör, un de Dook mit de Knakens wöör wech. Marleenken awerst wöör so recht licht un vörgnöögt, recht as wenn de Broder noch leewd. Do güng se wedder ganß lustig in dat Huus by Disch un eet.
But the bird flew away and lighted on a goldsmith's house, and began to sing De Vagel awerst flöög wech un sett,t sik up enen Goldsmidt syn Huus un füng an to singen
- my mother she killed me,
my father he ate me,
my sister, little Marlinchen,
gathered together all my bones,
tied them in a silken handkerchief,
laid them beneath the juniper tree,
kywitt, kywitt, what a beautiful bird am I.
'mein Mutter, der mich schlacht,
mein Vater, der mich aß,
mein Schwester, der Marlenichen,
sucht alle meine Benichen,
bind't sie in ein seiden Tuch'
legts unter den Machandelbaum.
Kywitt, kywitt, wat vör,n schöön Vagel bün ik!'
The goldsmith was sitting in his workshop making a golden chain, when he heard the bird which was sitting singing on his roof, and very beautiful the song seemed to him. He stood up, but as he crossed the threshold he lost one of his slippers. But he went away right up the middle of the street with one shoe on and one sock, he had his apron on, and in one hand he had the golden chain and in the other the pincers, and the sun was shining brightly on the street. Then he went right on and stood still, and said to the bird, "Bird," said he then, "how beautifully you can sing. Sing me that piece again." "No," said the bird, "I'll not sing it twice for nothing. Give me the golden chain, and then I will sing it again for you." "There," said the goldsmith, "there is the golden chain for you, now sing me that song again." Then the bird came and took the golden chain in his right claw, and went and sat in front of the goldsmith, and sang De Goldsmidt seet in syn Waarkstäd un maakd ene gollne Kede, do höörd he den Vagel, de up syn Dack seet und süng, un dat dünkd em so schöön. Da stünn he up, un as he äwer den Süll güng, da vörlöör he eenen Tüffel. He güng awer so recht midden up de Strat hen, eenen Tüffel un een Sock an: syn Schortfell hadd he vör, un in de een Hand hadd he de golln Kede un in de anner de Tang; un de Sünn schynd so hell up de Strat. Door güng he recht so staan un seeg den Vagel an. 'Vagel,' secht he do, 'wo schöön kannst du singen! Sing my dat Stück nochmaal.' 'Ne,' secht de Vagel, 'twemaal sing ik nich umsünst. Gif my de golln Kede, so will ik dy,t nochmaal singen.' 'Door,' secht de Goldsmidt, 'hest du de golln Kede, nu sing my dat nochmaal.' Do köhm de Vagel un nöhm de golln Kede so in de rechte Poot, un güng vor den Goldsmidt sitten un süng
- my mother she killed me,
my father he ate me,
my sister, little Marlinchen,
gathered together all my bones,
tied them in a silken handkerchief,
laid them beneath the juniper tree,
kywitt, kywitt, what a beautiful bird am I.
'mein Mutter, der mich schlacht,
mein Vater, der mich aß,
mein Schwester, der Marlenichen,
sucht alle meine Benichen,
bind't sie in ein seiden Tuch,
legts unter den Machandelbaum.
Kywitt, kywitt, wat vör'n schöön Vagel bün ik!'
Then the bird flew away to a shoemaker, and lighted on his roof and sang Da flög de Vagel wech na enem Schooster, und sett't sik up den syn Dack un süng
- my mother she killed me,
my father he ate me,
my sister, little Marlinchen,
gathered together all my bones,
tied them in a silken handkerchief,
laid them beneath the juniper tree,
kywitt, kywitt, what a beautiful bird am I.
'mein Mutter, der mich schlacht,
mein Vater, der mich aß,
mein Schwester, der Marlenichen,
sucht alle meine Benichen,
bind't sie in ein seiden Tuch,
legts unter den Machandelbaum.
Kywitt, kywirt, wat vör'n schöön Vagel bün ik!'
The shoemaker heard that and ran out of doors in his shirt sleeves, and looked up at his roof, and was forced to hold his hand before his eyes lest the sun should blind him. "Bird," said he, "how beautifully you can sing." Then he called in at his door, "Wife, just come outside, there is a bird, look at that bird, he certainly can sing." Then he called his daughter and children, and apprentices, boys and girls, and they all came up the street and looked at the bird and saw how beautiful he was, and what fine red and green feathers he had, and how like real gold his neck was, and how the eyes in his head shone like stars. "Bird," said the shoemaker, "now sing me that song again." "Nay," said the bird, "I do not sing twice for nothing, you must give me something." "Wife," said the man, "go to the garret, upon the top shelf there stands a pair of red shoes, bring them down." Then the wife went and brought the shoes. "There, bird," said the man, "now sing me that piece again." Then the bird came and took the shoes in his left claw, and flew back on the roof, and sang De Schooster höörd dat und leep vör syn Döhr in Hemdsaarmels, un seeg na syn Dack un mussd de Hand vör de Ogen hollen, dat de Sünn em nich blend't. 'Vagel,' secht he, 'wat kannst du schöön singen.' Do rööp he in syn Döhr henin 'Fru, kumm mal heruut, dar is een Vagel: süh mal den Vagel, de kann maal schöön singen.' Do rööp he syn Dochter un Kinner un Gesellen, Jung un Maagd, un se kömen all up de Strat un seegen den Vagel an, wo schöön he wöör, un he hadd so recht rode un gröne Feddern, un üm den Hals wöör dat as luter Gold, un de Ogen blünken em im Kopp as Steern. 'Vagel,' sägd de Schooster, 'nu sing my dat Stück nochmaal.' 'Ne,' secht de Vagel, 'tweemal sing ik nich umsünst, du must my wat schenken.' 'Fru,' säd de Mann, 'gah na dem Bähn: up dem bäwelsten Boord, door staan een Poor rode Schö, de bring herünn.' Do güng de Fru hen un hahl de Schö. 'Door, Vagel,' säd de Mann, 'nu sing my dat Stück nochmaal.' Do köhm de Vagel und nöhm de Schö in de linke Klau, un flöög wedder up dat Dack un süng
- my mother she killed me,
my father he ate me,
my sister, little Marlinchen,
gathered together all my bones,
tied them in a silken handkerchief,
laid them beneath the juniper tree,
kywitt, kywitt, what a beautiful bird am I.
'mein Mutter, der mich schlacht,
mein Vater, der mich aß,
mein Schwester, der Marlenichen,
sucht alle meine Benichen,
bind't sie in ein seiden Tuch,
legts unter den Machandelbaum.
Kywitt, kywirt, wat vör'n schöön Vagel bün ik!'
And when he had finished his song he flew away. In his right claw he had the chain and in his left the shoes, and he flew far away to a mill, and the mill went, klipp klapp, klipp klapp, klipp klapp, and in the mill sat twenty miller's men hewing a stone, and cutting, hick hack, hick hack, hick hack, and the mill went klipp klapp, klipp klapp, klipp klapp. Then the bird went and sat on a lime-tree which stood in front of the mill, and sang Un as he uutsungen hadd, so flöög he wech: de Kede hadd he in de rechte und de Schö in de linke Klau, un he flöög wyt wech na ene Mähl, un de Mähl güng 'klippe klappe, klippe klappe, klippe klappe.' Un in de Mähl, door seeten twintig Mählenburßen, de hauden enen Steen und hackden 'hick hack, hick hack, hick hack,' un de Mähl güng 'klippe klappe, klippe klappe, klippe klappe.' Do güng de Vagel up enen Lindenboom sitten, de vör de Mähl stünn, un süng
- my mother she killed me,
then one of them stopped working,
my father he ate me,
then two more stopped working and listened to that,
my sister, little Marlinchen,
then four more stopped,
gathered together all my bones,
tied them in a silken handkerchief,
now eight only were hewing,
laid them beneath, now only five,
the juniper tree, and now only one,
kywitt, kywitt, what a beautiful bird am I.
'mein Mutter, der mich schlacht,
do höörd een up,
'mein Vater, der mich aß,'
do höörden noch twe up un höörden dat,
mein Schwester, der Marlenichen,
do höörden wedder veer up,
'sucht alle meine Benichen,
bind't sie in ein seiden Tuch,'
nu hackden noch man acht,
'legts unter'
nu noch man fyw,
'den Machandelbaum.'
nu noch man een.
'Kywitt, kywitt, wat vör'n schöön Vagel bün ik!'
Then the last stopped also, and heard the last words. "Bird," said he, "how beautifully you sing. Let me, too, hear that. Sing that once more for me." "Nay," said the bird, "I will not sing twice for nothing. Give me the millstone, and then I will sing it again." "Yes," said he, "if it belonged to me only, you should have it." "Yes," said the others, "if he sings again he shall have it." Then the bird came down, and the twenty millers all set to work with a beam and raised the stone up. And the bird stuck his neck through the hole, and put the stone on as if it were a collar, and flew on to the tree again, and sang Da hüll de lezte ook up und hadd dat lezte noch höörd. 'Vagel,' secht he, 'wat singst du schöön! laat my dat ook hören, sing my dat nochmaal.' 'Ne,' secht de Vagel, 'twemaal sing ik nich umsünst, gif my den Mählensteen, so will ik dat nochmaal singen.' 'Ja,' secht he, 'wenn he my alleen tohöörd, so schullst du em hebben.' 'Ja,' säden de annern, 'wenn he nochmaal singt, so schall he em hebben.' Do köhm de Vagel herünn, un de Möllers faat,n all twintig mit Böhm an un böhrden Steen up, 'hu uh uhp, hu uh uhp, hu uh uhp!' Da stöök de Vagel den Hals döör dat Lock un nöhm em üm as enen Kragen, un flöög wedder up den Boom un süng
- my mother she killed me,
my father he ate me,
my sister, little Marlinchen,
gathered together all my bones,
tied them in a silken handkerchief,
laid them beneath the juniper tree,
kywitt, kywitt, what a beautiful bird am I.
'mein Mutter, der mich schlacht,
mein Vater, der mich aß,
mein Schwester, der Marlenichen,
sucht alle meine Benichen,
bind't sie in ein seiden Tuch,
legts unter den Machandelbaum.
Kywitt, kywirt, wat vör'n schöön Vagel bün ik!'
And when he had done singing, he spread his wings, and in his right claw he had the chain, and in his left the shoes, and round his neck the millstone, and he flew far away to his father's house. Un as he dat uutsungen hadd, do deed he de Flünk von eenanner, un hadd in de rechte Klau de Kede un in de linke de Schö un üm den Hals den Mählensteen, un floog wyt wech na synes Vaders Huse.
In the room sat the father, the mother, and Marlinchen at dinner, and the father said, "How light-hearted I feel, how happy I am." "Nay," said the mother, "I feel so uneasy, just as if a heavy storm were coming." Marlinchen, however, sat weeping and weeping, and then came the bird flying, and as it seated itself on the roof the father said, "Ah, I feel so truly happy, and the sun is shining so beautifully outside, I feel just as if I were about to see some old friend again." "Nay," said the woman, "I feel so anxious, my teeth chatter, and I seem to have fire in my veins." And she tore her stays open, but Marlinchen sat in a corner crying, and held her plate before her eyes and cried till it was quite wet. Then the bird sat on the juniper tree, and sang In de Stuw seet de Vader, de Moder un Marleenken by Disch, un de Vader säd 'ach, wat waart my licht, my is recht so good to Mode.' 'Nä,' säd de Moder, 'my is recht so angst, so recht, as wenn en swoor Gewitter kummt.' Marleenken awerst seet un weend un weend, da köhm de Vagel anflogen, un as he sik up dat Dack sett,t, 'ach,' säd de Vader, 'my is so recht freudig, un de Sünn schynt buten so schöön, my is recht, as schull ik enen olen Bekannten weddersehn.' 'Ne,' säd de Fru, 'my is so angst, de Täne klappern my, un dat is my as Führ in den Adern.' Un se reet sik ehr Lyfken up un so mehr, awer Marleenken seet in en Eck un weend, und hadd eren Platen vör de Ogen, un weend den Platen ganß meßnatt. Do sett,t sik de Vagel up den Machandelboom un süng
- my mother she killed me, then the mother stopped her ears, and shut her eyes, and would not see or hear, but there was a roaring in her ears like the most violent storm, and her eyes burnt and flashed like lightning 'mein Mutter, der mich schlacht,' Do hüll de Moder de Oren to un kneep de Ogen to, un wull nich sehn un hören, awer dat bruusde ehr in de Oren as de allerstaarkste Storm, un de Ogen brennden ehr un zackden as Blitz.
- my father he ate me, "Ah, mother," says the man, "that is a beautiful bird. He sings so splendidly, and the sun shines so warm, and there is a smell just like cinnamon." 'mein Vater, der mich aß,' 'Ach, Moder,' secht de Mann, 'door is en schöön Vagel, de singt so herrlich, de Sünn schynt so warm, un dat rückt as luter Zinnemamen.'
My sister, little Marlinchen, then Marlinchen laid her head on her knees and wept without ceasing, but the man said, "I am going out, I must see the bird quite close." "Oh, don't go," said the woman, "I feel as if the whole house were shaking and on fire." But the man went out and looked at the bird. 'mein Schwester, der Marlenichen,' Do läd Marleenken den Kopp up de Knee un weend in eens wech, de Mann awerst säd 'ik ga henuut, ik mutt den Vagel dicht by sehn.' 'Ach, gah nich,' säd de Fru, 'my is, as beewd dat ganße Huus un stünn in Flammen.' Awerst de Mann güng henuut un seeg den Vagel an.
gathered together all my bones,
tied them in a silken handkerchief,
laid them beneath the juniper tree,
kywitt, kywitt, what a beautiful bird am I.
'sucht alle meine Benichen,
bind't sie in ein seiden Tuch,
legts unter den Machandelbaum.
Kywitt, kywitt, wat vör'n schöön Vagel bün ik!'
On this the bird let the golden chain fall, and it fell exactly round the man's neck, and so exactly round it that it fitted beautifully. Then he went in and said, "just look what a fine bird that is, and what a handsome golden chain he has given me, and how pretty he is." But the woman was terrified, and fell down on the floor in the room, and her cap fell off her head. Then sang the bird once more Mit des leet de Vagel de gollne Kede fallen, un se feel dem Mann jüst um,n Hals, so recht hier herüm, dat se recht so schöön passd. Do güng he herin un säd 'süh, wat is dat vör,n schöön Vagel, heft my so,ne schöne gollne Kede schenkd, un süht so schöön uut.' De Fru awerst wöör so angst un füll langs in de Stuw hen, un de Mütz füll ehr von dem Kopp. Do süng de Vagel wedder
- my mother she killed me.
"Would that I were a thousand feet beneath the earth so as not to hear that."
My father he ate me, then the woman fell down again as if dead.
'mein Mutter, der mich schlacht,'
'Ach, dat ik dusend Föder ünner de Eerd wöör, dat ik dat nich hören schull!'
mein Vater, der mich aß,'
Do füll de Fru vör dood nedder.
My sister, little Marlinchen,
"Ah," said Marlinchen, "I too will go out and see if the bird will give me anything," and she went out.
Gathered together all my bones,
tied them in a silken handkerchief, then he threw down the shoes to her.
Laid them beneath the juniper tree,
kywitt, kywitt, what a beautiful bird am I.
mein Schwester, der Marlenichen,'
'Ach,' säd Marleenken, 'ik will ook henuut gahn un sehn, of de Vagel my wat schenkt.' Do güng se henuut.
'sucht alle meine Benichen'
bind't sie in ein seiden Tuch '
Do schmeet he ehr de Schö herünn.
legts unter den Machandelbaum.
Kywitt, kywitt, wat vör'n schöön Vagel bün ik!'

Then she was light-hearted and joyous, and she put on the new red shoes, and danced and leaped into the house. "Ah," said she, "I was so sad when I went out and now I am so light-hearted, that is a splendid bird, he has given me a pair of red shoes." "Well," said the woman, and sprang to her feet and her hair stood up like flames of fire, "I feel as if the world were coming to an end. I too, will go out and see if my heart feels lighter." And as she went out at the door, crash. The bird threw down the millstone on her head, and she was entirely crushed by it. The father and Marlinchen heard what had happened and went out, and smoke, flames, and fire were rising from the place, and when that was over, there stood the little brother, and he took his father and Marlinchen by the hand, and all three were right glad, and they went into the house to dinner, and ate.

Do wöör ehr so licht un fröhlich. Do truck se den neen roden Schö an, un danßd un sprüng herin. 'Ach,' säd se, 'ik wöör so trurig, as ick henuut güng, un nu is my so licht, dat is maal en herrlichen Vagel, hett my en Poor rode Schö schenkd.' 'Ne,' säd de Fru und sprüng up, un de Hoor stünnen ehr to Baarg as Führsflammen, 'my is, as schull de Welt ünnergahn, ik will ook henuut, of my lichter warden schull.' Un as se uut de Döhr köhm, bratsch! smeet ehr de Vagel den Mählensteen up den Kopp, dat se ganß tomatscht wurr. De Vader un Marleenken höörden dat un güngen henuut: do güng en Damp un Flamm un Führ up von der Städ, un as dat vorby wöör, do stünn de lüttje Broder door, un he nöhm synen Vader un Marleenken by der Hand, un wören all dre so recht vergnöögt un güngen in dat Huus by Disch, un eeten.

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